Looking to the Future

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There is one question that everyone, at one point or another, gets asked, and it always stumps me. And my answer usually takes more explaining than either party was prepared for.
 
Where do you see yourself in five years? Ten years? X number of years?
 
My first reaction usually involves a momentary brain choke. Some people may jump immediately into panic mode. It seems like such a simple question but it forces us to stare straight into the great unknown and that can be terrifying.
 
There are some people who have their whole lives planned out. They know exactly what they want to do, exactly who they want to be. They make those of us who aren’t like that wonder what we are doing wrong.
 
I wondered that myself for a while. I wondered if I would ever get anywhere in my life.
 
It took a while, but I finally realized something. There is nothing wrong with me.
 
I just look at things differently.
 
You see, part of why the future is so scary is because of the unknown. Often times in stories the most powerful character is the one that has the ability to see the future. We want to have some sense of control over our lives.
 
The unknown doesn’t have to be scary, though. It can be wonderful.
 
Things in life rarely go as planned. Life is complicated. It is weird. And above all, it is chock full of the unexpected.
 
Its okay if you don’t have all the details figured out. Its okay if all you have is a general idea of where you would like to eventually be. It’s okay.
 
Right now, at this point in my life, given all the variables, I have a general picture of what my life could look like in five years. That is assuming nothing changes.
 
That assumption is what gives me hope. Because things change. There is no telling what amazing opportunities will wander into your life on down the road.
 
If you had told me five years ago that I would be sitting here, working on this blog post after finishing a Twitch stream (and the game I was streaming), with a YouTube channel, a few freelance gigs and plans to launch a podcast or two…I would probably have started laughing after the first few items. I never imagined that my life would turn out this way, but I am so glad it did.
 
Of course, I have plans for the future. A list of things that I would like to have accomplished and a picture of what I want my life to look like. It is all very general, though. Because I want to stay open to whatever comes my way.
 
There are benefits to being flexible, being adaptable. I learned a long time ago to go with the flow because you never know what will happen. Even when it seems like everything is falling apart, you have to find a way to keep going forward.
 
Now, I am in no way telling you to not chase your dreams. By all means, chase it. Even if it seems impossible, never stop chasing your dream.
 
Your chosen job/industry may be hard to get into. I know mine is. It may feel impossible. It is possible, it might be difficult. These things take time, patience, and a fair amount of networking. Find something that will keep you afloat in the meantime. Use that income to fund your dream, and keep your eyes open for any unexpected opportunities.
 
You never know what life may throw your way. Keep your mind open and be ready for anything.
 
Never stop dreaming. And never stop hoping for tomorrow.

How to not Retcon

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I think we can all agree that retconning is bad. We have been there, covered that. Time to move on.

Now, how do we avoid retconning?

I have been putting some thought into this recently. As a writer, I understand how easy it can be to let details slip or lose track of where a particular plot thread was going. As the story grows and morphs, and you move beyond the first draft, things can get lost.

The one I am currently working on has gone through some drastic changes, and it includes possible character name changes part of the way through the book. I’ve trimmed down my cast of characters quite a bit, but there is still a lot to keep track of.

So here are a few things I am going to do to keep my story straight.

Note: there are wonderful programs, such as Scrivner, that help with this but as I do not have any such program, my suggestions will reflect this.

Plot, plot, plot

You may be thinking “duh, we all know how to plot.” Hear me out.

I’ve mentioned before that my current project has gone through a lot of changes. When starting on the most recent draft/iteration, I created a detailed plot outline detailing my idea. Then I talked through the plot with my friend, resulting in some of those points being changed.

I then went back and reworked the plot outline. Its a goal of mine to always have an up-to-date plot outline. The practice may seem like a waste of time, but as your story changes adjusting your outline can help you easier keep track of the current plot.

Also, by intentionally plotting things out ahead of time and throughout the process, this could help you create a smoother, more coherent plot.

It is easy enough to do and will save you a lot of trouble in the long run.

When in doubt, leave it out

Perhaps “keep it vague” is a better way to phrase it.

Picture this:
A writer decides far into the story that they want to do something with a character or the plot that differs from their original plan. They have not built up to this in any way, and chances are they have already hinted that things were going to go differently.

I know I have seen it before and I am pretty sure you have too, at least once. It is super annoying and has a nasty habit of ruining whatever impact that moment might have had.

My solution?

If you aren’t sure where you want to go with something, keep it vague. Don’t give any direct answer as to which way it could go. Even better, leave hints that it could go either way. By leaving it vague or uncertain as to which way something could go, you make the reveal of the truth that much more rewarding.

It can also give you time to consider why you are thinking about doing whatever it is. If it is important to the plot, great. If it is for shock value, maybe reconsider. But that is a topic for another time.

Make a cheat sheet

This relates back to the first point about keeping an up-to-date plot outline.

Odd names for people and places. Important objects that exchange ownership. Convoluted plot threads. If there is a chance you could forget or lose track of things in your story, consider creating a cheat sheet.

Keep records of your characters, how to spell their names, their backstories, how they are related to the others. Write down what they look like and make notes of when that might have changed.

Trace the ownership of important items and note what was going on when they changed hands.

Use the highlighter to visually mark important events and add them to your cheat sheet.

Yes, tools like Scrivener make this much easier, but there are ways to function without them. Use whatever tools you have at your disposal to keep your story straight.

Get more eyes

Lastly, it helps a lot to have a second pair of eyes. Get a friend or someone you trust to read over your work.

I know you have spent hours upon hours pouring over your work. That is part of the problem. You are so familiar with every single word that you are bound to miss things. By having someone who has never seen it before (that may or may not already know the story), you are increasing the likelihood of catching any slip-ups.

I have done this for friends before and helped catch some name mix-ups as well as things that were not made clear. It can be hugely beneficial and, by giving it to a friend, you know you can trust their advice. Also, they are less likely to tear your work into tiny little pieces.

Now, this doesn’t mean that you don’t need to hire an editor. Those are needed too.

Hopefully, you will find these tips and tricks useful when tackling your next literary adventure.

Next week we are going to be tackling one of my favorite questions and the uncertainty it can cause.

As always if you have any questions or comments, leave them down below. I am always looking for new topics to cover!

Until then!

Think Before You Retcon

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If there is one thing readers can’t stand, it is a retcon. Whether you are changing an inconsequential detail or something big, they will notice and they will not be happy.

Now, there are lots of reasons that a writer retcons. Stories can change a lot as they are being told. Sometimes this results in the writer wanting to go back and change something. If the work is unpublished, this can be easy. When the work is published, though, it can be tricky.

It can be very easy to do, especially if you are writing a series. It can be detrimental, though, to your reputation and your story. Here are a few reasons you should think hard before you retcon.

It irritates the reader

When you go back and change something that is already established in the story, it annoys the reader. If it is a small thing, then they might be able to overlook it, but if it is bigger…it’s not going to be good. At the very least you are going to throw your reader for a loop, and they are not going to like that.

You want your readers to be focused on the story, to become engrossed, attached to it. The last thing you want is to have them raging against your retconning.

Sometimes a retcon can undo the significance of an event, or damage a character arch. This can tank your story. Retcon something your audience loves, they will not soon forget it. If it messes with the arc of their favorite character…let’s just say you don’t want to go there.

You also run the risk of confusing the reader. The plot should have twists and turns, yes, but it should be solid. Steady. It should not sneakily rewrite itself (unless you are doing this intentionally, but that is another conversation).

It makes your writing look weak

When you retcon, it reflects poorly on your skills as a writer. Even if it is something small, such as a character’s hair color, your readers will not be impressed.

Retconning something small makes you look like you are forgetful, neglectful. Now, I know how much planning and crafting goes into telling a good story. It takes even more to write that story. So I get that it can be easy to miss the little details. There are some details, though, that you need to keep straight. Otherwise, the readers might think you don’t care.

Drastically changing your plot, despite things you set up earlier in the series, makes you come across like someone who has no idea what they are doing. We have all seen this happen in shows and movies. It either leaves you confused or frustrated, and wondering why the writer couldn’t pick a plot. They look like they either did not plan ahead, have no idea what they are doing, or both. Probably both.

There are a few other, smaller things that can cause a big impact. Changing how a character’s name is spelled, either partway through the story or every so often. Switching up how the characters are related. The first one is easy to do and, depending on how odd the name is, can be forgiven by the reader. Heck, they may not even notice. But with the second one, they are a lot more likely to catch on. This will not end well for you.

 

The moral of the story is don’t retcon. It can be annoying for the readers and it makes you look like a bad writer.

Next week I am going to share some tips on how to avoid retconning. As always, feel free to leave a comment if there is anything you would like to add or if you have any questions.

Until next time!

Write What You Need

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Write what you know. One of the most common pieces of writing advice you will ever hear. It’s not wrong either. As writers, we draw from our personal experience to help bring our stories and characters to life. There is absolutely nothing wrong with this.

But it doesn’t always have to be that way.

People are always going to tell you how you should be writing or what you should be writing about. Sometimes they have good advice. Other times they mean well, but they are the opposite of helpful.

Tell the story you want to tell. That you need to tell.

The stories we tell don’t always fit into our personal experiences. Just look at fantasy, sci-fi, and murder mysteries. Literally any form of fiction. While our experiences and opinions influence the stories, you are in no way required to write within your world. Sometimes you need to step outside of what you know and step into what you need.

Writing, in and of itself, is a form of exploration. It is a massive thought experiment full of “what if this…” It is a chance for people to think through things they have always wondered about. A chance for writers to create the world they have always dreamed of. We get to live in a world that is completely our own where, for once, we are in control.

It is a form of escapism for the writer as well as the reader. We all struggle. We all experience hardships. Some of us have struggles that never really go away. We have this baggage that we just have to learn to live with. We all have to face the darkness and there will always be something we wish we could have or experience, that we know will never happen.

Some of the most beautiful stories come from what we wish for, what we want. Writing gives us a chance to hold up a mirror and show the world what needs to change. How the world can be better.

When life gets crazy and things get messy, we don’t need a reminder of how scary the world can be. Life is hard. Life isn’t fair. We are all aware of this. We need to see that things can be better. That life isn’t all bad. That there is hope.

Instead of writing what you know, write what you need. Because chances are the world needs it too.

Just Write

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If writers are good at one thing, we are really good at procrastinating when we should be writing. It happens all of the time. I am especially guilty of this. I wrote a story during my junior year of high school and I still have not finished the second draft. I graduated from college in December.

There are lots of reasons we don’t write. We don’t have the motivation. We don’t have the time. We aren’t in the zone. Or, my personal favorite, the story isn’t ready yet.

At least, that is what we say.

We really avoid it because we aren’t ready. There is something holding us back. We are afraid of failure, of rejection. We are afraid to try because we don’t know if anyone is listening.

I know I can’t be the only one who is tired of this. It is time for us to overcome the things that are holding us back and move past everything that is holding us back. It is time for us to start writing.

The thing is, your novel isn’t going to write itself. As amazing as that would be, it is simply not going to happen. You have to sit down, put your fingers on your keys, and get to work.

If your response is “my story isn’t ready yet”, I have something to say to that. I spend about a month prepping a plot outline for NaNoWriMo, got 64 pages through and I could not get the story moving. It was terrible. During that time, though, I created two characters who ended up taking over the story. It turns out I was telling the wrong story about the wrong characters.

My point is, no matter how much preparation you put into your novel the story will change as you write it. It will breathe, grow, take you in directions you never expected. As you write your story will improve because you realize that certain things you have will not work. You find other things that will work better. You find and fill all of the plot holes as you go.

Your story can’t go anywhere if you don’t start writing it.

Another common struggle I see among writers is “why bother writing if no one is going to read it?” We convince ourselves that no one could possibly be interested in what we have to say. This could come from getting shut down when we try and talk about certain things or just a low self-esteem. We think we have nothing to offer.

Sometimes, you just have to write for yourself. Don’t worry about what your friends will think. Don’t worry about your family’s opinion. Don’t worry about what anyone else would say or think. You have a story inside of you, and even if you never show it to anyone else, you should still write it. Get it down on paper. You owe it to yourself to prove that you are capable of writing that story. That you are capable of finishing something.

If you are worried about what other people might think because of the content of the story, you can always publish under a pseudonym. This can also be helpful if you normally write in another genre, to prevent confusion.

Something else to keep in mind if you are worried no one will like your story. Consider this. Are you part of a fan community? Do you share interests and passions with other people? Do you yourself enjoy the story you have created?

If you answered yes to any of these, then I can guarantee that someone somewhere will like your book. I’ll go more into this in a later post, but trust me when I say that if you tell a good story people will like it. They will read it. They will identify with the characters. They will enjoy the plot. They will see that you did it and realize that they can do it too.

But none of this will happen if you never finish the dang book.

Now, if you will excuse me, I have some writing to do.

Why We Tell Stories

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If you have not guessed by now, I am a bit of a nerd when it comes to storytelling. As human beings, we have been telling each other stories as long as we have been capable of communication. We have had this intrinsic desire to share our experiences with others. No matter what part of the world you are from, what culture, what religion, we all have our stories.

And we are creating more every day. Between blogs, podcasts, games, movies, tv shows, books, poems, (and any other medium I may have missed) there are countless new stories created each day. Instagram, Facebook, and Snapchat have stories and Twitter has moments. We cannot seem to get away from this need to share.

Why is that? What are stories so important?

Making sense of the world

All you have to do is look at mythology and legends to see how stories help us make sense of the world. Myths are stories people created to explain what was happening around them. They created the gods and goddesses to explain how the world came to be and how humanity was created, as well as all manner of natural phenomena. They did this to feel like they had some sort of control over the world, that they could appease these deities into doing what they wanted. It also gave them something to blame when the worst happened.

The stories of heroes help them understand their place in the world. Whether in relation to the deities or their society, these stories work as a sort of social blueprint. The heroes and heroines and damsels all serve to show people what is expected of them. The evil witches and wizards and temptresses show what is not acceptable.

You also have fairy tales. Short, fantastical stories used to teach children to behave. They usually feature misbehaving children who suffer the dire consequences of their actions. The original versions of these stories can be quite terrifying and, contrary to popular belief, the Grimm fairy tales were not written for children.

Even though we are older and wiser and know these stories to be untrue, they continue to captivate us. Part of this can be attributed to Disney as well as Marvel and DC Comics, of course. But even without that, we are still drawn to these older tales. They are timeless and curious and I can’t help but marvel at how much they tell us about where we came from as humans.

Making sense of our lives

When you read, write, or tell a story, you experience things through the character’s eyes. We identify with them because we see part of ourselves in them. Some people live vicariously through them because their lives are more interesting. We celebrate when they celebrate. We mourn when they mourn. Sometimes we even grow up with them.

Writing the story adds a whole new layer to this. There is a quote that says a writer lives a thousand lives, and it is really true. Reading a book, you have no idea how the story started or what all it went through. There are countless revisions, additions, sometimes a genre shift or two. Some stories may even have started with a completely different main character.

We pour so much of ourselves into the world, the plot, and the characters. It is impossible not too. We use these stories to work through whatever it is we are struggling with. It may seem like we are using writing to avoid our problems but for many of us, it is how we process things.

Journaling is another form of telling a story, although few people ever get to read our journals. The act of physically writing down what is going on in your life is very therapeutic. It is like being able to share all your secrets with someone who never judges and never tells. Here you can work out exactly what you are thinking and feeling with no fear of repercussions. While I refer to writing as thinking on paper, journaling is feeling on paper.

Making connections

As I said earlier, mankind has been telling stories since we were able to communicate. These stories can connect people in ways you may not realize.

Look at fan communities. People bonding over a shared love of a story or series of stories. Not only does this give people a chance to share their thoughts and opinions, but they do so much more.

These communities allow people to build lasting friendships with people from all around the world. They gather together to support each other in times of need. They help teach people that it is okay to be different, to like different things, to have different interests. They show people what it is like to feel accepted.

This applies to online communities as well as when people run into each other and realize they share an interest.

There is another way that sharing stories can help bond us to people. We all have stories we wish were not true of our lives. Things that we have done, things that happened to us, things we have to struggle with. These are the stories we keep to ourselves unless we really, truly trust someone.

We don’t always realize that the people around us have those stories too. By opening up and sharing your experiences and your struggles with someone, you let them know they can open up to you. We are less alone than we think. My personal experience has been that our struggles are not uncommon.

It is okay to struggle. It is okay to doubt. It is okay to share this with people. Friends can help you come to terms with what you are dealing with, help you realize you are not alone, and help you find a way to move past it.

All in all, the world would be a much darker place without stories.

How have stories changed your life?

The Origin of Solitude

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The Origin of Solitude

A fairytale

Once upon a time, there lived a dragon name Solitude.  Solitude was born to two very old dragons, their only child.  From the start, all of the other dragons knew there was something different about Solitude.  While he very much enjoyed the company of the other dragonlings, Solitude was just as happy being on his own. Since his parents died while he was still very young, he was mostly raised by another dragon family who adopted him, surrounding him with half a dozen siblings he got along with relatively well. He also had a peculiar interest in the small village that laid within a day’s journey of his home, of which he knew very little but loved to daydream of.  It was an unwritten rule among the dragons that they were not to have any interaction with the village’s inhabitants.  Being a good little dragon, Solitude did as he was told.  In fact, it was not until the village had grown so large that the two groups were forced to communicate that he even knew who the inhabitants were.

Once the leaders of the dragons realized there was no avoiding the villagers anymore, they set up an envoy to reach a peace settlement.  The villagers were already aware of the dragons, having seen them many times flying overhead, and so were very curious to speak with the amazing creatures.  The leaders of the dragons thought long and hard about who they would choose to be the intermediary.  After a period of debate, it was decided that Solitude would be the dragon representative.  With his gentle yet pensive nature, they decided that he would be the one most suited to communicate with the strange new beings.  At this point he had grown to be quite the intelligent dragon, studying and observing everything.  His community had come to respect him as a source of great wisdom, despite his relatively young age.  He still preferred to spend time on his own, observing the world around him, but was more than willing to help anyone in need.  When the elders came to him with the offer of allowing him to be their representative, he accepted it immediately yet humbly.  Soon after this, the humans selected their representative and it was time for the two to meet.

The human representative turned out to be a young girl who, like Solitude, was different from the others.  At first, the meeting was rather stiff and formal, as this was the first time either of them had ever spoken to one of the other kind. After a while, though, they settled into a comfortable conversation, each intrigued to learn more about the other.  Hours went by in the same manner, questions being passed back and forth and answers being listened to eagerly.  Each day they would discuss and decide on certain points that their elders put to them, as well as more personal things.  As time went on Solitude and Serenity became the best of friends, despite their differences.  They were among the few, though, once the council came to be.  Half human, half dragon, the council was created to negotiate and enact the peace between the two groups.  It was soon discovered that on the whole, humans and dragons did not get along.  Months of tense negotiation went by with both Solitude and Serenity watching with great concern the proceedings.  They did their best to act as intermediaries so as to keep hostilities to a minimum and decrease the likely hood of conflict.  After about half a year, it was decided that both groups would separate and no longer have direct contact.  The dragons would move up into a nearby mountain range while the humans would remain on the other side of the foothills.  Upon hearing this, Solitude and Serenity pushed for a neutral land to be made in between where humans and dragons could intermingle if they so decided.  It took much convincing, but eventually, it was agreed upon that the small forest between the mountain and the plain would be reserved as a neutral ground.  As both sides retreated to their lands, Solitude and Serenity began to set themselves up a home in the forest.  Serenity had several of her human friends come and help her build a house, with Solitude helping to supply the lumber and anything else they needed. Some of his adopted siblings came to visit as well, interested to see his new home.  The humans and the dragons interacted some, but none became as good of friends as Solitude and Serenity.  As time went on, the dragons’ visits became less and less frequent, to the point that most of their company was human.  This suited them just fine.

They settled quite comfortably into their new homes, happy to still be able to spend time together.  Every so often, some of the people Serenity grew up with would come and visit her, bearing supplies and news from the village.  Solitude was surprised to find that she too, had grown up an orphan, practically raising herself.  They took turns regaling their guests and each other with stories from their childhood.  Sometimes Serenity would return to the town to visit some of her older friends, and Solitude would use this time to look in on his adopted siblings or explore the woods.  Years passed in this manner, and Solitude began to grow distant from his dragon relatives.  Even Serenity’s visits to town became less frequent.  With Solitude’s help, she had become quite self-sufficient, growing her own food and herbs.  She took in and raised several of the orphans from the town with Solitude’s help.  It was as if they had a family of their own, and Solitude was content.  The children would grow up and eventually return to life in the town, sometimes even traveling to far off lands.  Before long, Solitude and Serenity found themselves along once more.  This suited them just fine.

As the years went by, though, Solitude began to notice a problem.  Even though he was still quite young, Serenity was beginning to grow old and was having trouble caring for herself.  He helped her out as best as he could, but one day she grew so ill that he knew what he had to do.  After much urging, he managed to convince her to return to the town to get help.  She wrote to one of the boys she grew up with, asking him to send someone to collect her.  Solitude waited with her patiently, carrying all of her belongings that she might need.  She was rather reluctant to leave her beloved Solitude alone, but he reassured her that he would be fine.  He promised to tend her garden while she was gone and to be there when she returned.  When her ride finally arrived, Solitude recognized him as one of the children Serenity had raised.  He was surprised to see Serenity so ill and expressed his thanks to Solitude for taking such good care of her.  Before he left he told Solitude that he did not know how long it would be before Serenity was able to return.  Solitude assured him that he would be just fine on his own and that he was to content to wait for Serenity, however long it took.  Without any more conversation, the man hopped on his horse and started off, Serenity comfortably seated in a cart behind him.  Solitude watched her and she him until both were out of sight.  He remained there long after, calmly observing the world around him, reveling in the silence.

Months passed by and Solitude did exactly as he had promised, caring for Serenity’s garden, guarding her house, and every day waiting for her to return.  Each day he found some way to entertain himself, stretching his wings, exploring the forest, going for a swim in the pond in the middle of the forest.  He rarely hunted, for he needed very little food to survive.  For the longest time, he had no company at all, yet he was content for he knew that one day Serenity would return to him and all would be as it once was.

When the months turned into years, Solitude grew concerned.  Part of him wanted to fly to the town, but he kept his promise to Serenity, waiting for her in the spot where she had left him.  One day, many years later, Solitude discovered a young man waiting for him in the woods.  Curious at this change, he slowly approached him and asked if he was in need of assistance.  The man explained that he was here to deliver a message and asked where he could find the dragon named Solitude.  Knowing that this could only mean one thing, Solitude quickly explained that he was that dragon.  The man sighed in relief, apologizing for not being there sooner.  It had taken them a long time before someone realized that ‘solitude’ was indeed a dragon.  Once they had figured that out, he grabbed the letter and ran out to the forest to find him.  He explained that the letter was from none other than Serenity, and thus began to read it aloud.

My Dearest Solitude,

It has been many a month since I left your care, and yet I fear that I will not be returning to you any time soon.  You see, I have become very old and very ill, and the doctors have been telling me that I am not long for this world.  I do apologize, my dear friend, that I am not able to deliver this message to you in person.  My health is failing me and it takes all of my energy to pen these words.  The boy caring for me has promised to deliver this to you immediately upon my death.

Of all my friends in this world, you are the one I hold most dear.  With your great wisdom and kindness and devotion, you are one of the rarest, most beautiful beings in this world.  You have filled my life with light and I only hope that one day you will meet someone who does the same for you.  I do hope that you have not waited too long for me.  Now that I am gone, it is time for you to go home.  Return to your people.  Start a new life filled with adventure and wonder.  You deserve nothing less.

My only regret in life is that I was not able to see you one last time.  I will forever cherish the memory of our time together, and have already passed down our story to my children.  I hope that you will one day do the same.

All my love,

Serenity

It was a while before Solitude was able to respond.  The man waited patiently.  He asked of her last days, whether or not she was any pain, which the man assured him she was not.  They briefly discussed her life and Solitude asked if the man needed a place to spend the night.  He stated that he did not.  In fact, he needed to return home to his family, for his children were expecting him.  His youngest was in bed with a fever, but upon finding the letter he had felt compelled to ensure that it was delivered promptly.  He remembered very well the stories his grandfather had told of being raised in the woods by Serenity and her dragon.  When he asked what Solitude would do now that Serenity was gone, Solitude replied that he would follow her wishes.  After arranging to have someone come and take care of her garden, he decided to leave for the mountains.  With that they parted ways, Solitude wishing the man and his daughter well, thanking him for his kindness.

Solitude spent his last night in the forest curled up around Serenity’s cottage, mourning her loss.  The next day he left to return to his mountain home, to his people.  When he arrived he was surprised to find the mountains completely empty.  The dragons had left without Solitude.  He wandered around for hours, looking for any sign of where they could have gone, but it was fruitless.  Eventually, he realized the sun had gone down, and so he slipped into one of the empty caves and slept the night.  The next morning he flew back to the forest.  Back at the cottage, he was pleased to see someone was already there.  They were surprised to see him approach but he told them that they had no reason to fear, he was only there for the moment.  He proceeded to instruct them on how to handle some of the more precious of Serenity’s plants and belongings.  The young man looked at him in awe, finally explaining that he had never seen a dragon before.  This puzzled Solitude.  He went on to share of how there were stories of dragons in the sky, but no one had seen them since his great grandfather’s time.  This saddened Solitude, but he did not let it show.  When the boy asked if he would be staying, he thanked him for his service and said that he would not be.  He asked no more questions, and Solitude disappeared into the woods.  Without considering where he was going he wandered, eventually finding himself wading into the pond.  He went for a brief swim, allowing the cool water to soothe his mind, the sounds and feel of nature lulling him into a state of relaxation.

Making up his mind he climbed out of the pond, shaking the water off.  Lifting his head to the sky, he took a deep breath.  Without another second’s thought, he leaped into the sky and took off, heading away from the village, away from the mountains.  Away from Serenity.  With no particular destination in mind, he flew, enjoying the sun on his back as he went off to his new adventure. In his own way, he was honoring his beloved Serenity, whom he would always keep in his heart, until the end of his days.  Solitude was content.